Wildcat

Wildcat

Barber’s Open Call Mining Exchange was in the heart of Cobalt’s commercial district, “The Square.” All were welcome to join, as long as they could afford the $50 membership fee.  The building was located on Argentite Street, opposite to where the Golden Age Club is located today. By the end of 1906, Barber had moved … Continue reading Wildcat

Why Airy Somethings?

Why Airy Somethings?

It is possible that the image from the March 1909 edition of Punch was on Barber’s mind when he wrote Airy Nothings, a small book of six chapters and a poem. Horatio penned the curious volume while he was on a fortnight’s leave in Torquay. Most of the chapters are lightly disguised accounts of his … Continue reading Why Airy Somethings?

The “F” Word

The “F” Word

In this case, “F” is for “Fraudster.” Horatio Barber was a stock promoter in Cobalt in 1906 and then in 1907, he shifted his focus to Larder Lake. There he and his associates promoted the Larder Lake Proprietary Gold Fields Mine. First order of business was organizing a company. Directors of a mining company, especially … Continue reading The “F” Word

1911 VALKYRIE MONOPLANE PART 2

1911 VALKYRIE MONOPLANE PART 2

Barber created quite the stir when he unveiled his Valkyrie “canard” style aeroplane. Dennis Simanaitis has written a two part article about Horatio Barber’s Valkyrie. – this link take you to part 2

Simanaitis Says

YESTERDAY, WE HAD Horatio Barber’s Valkyrie demonstrating its short take-off capability by charging directly at admiring crowds. Today in Part 2, the Valkyrie continues to entertain, becomes the world’s first air transport (of sorts), and provides me with a fine GMax project.

On the Valkyrie’s Crowd-Pleasing. Kenneth Munson wrote in his Pioneer Aircraft 1903-1914 – The Pocket Encyclopaedia of World Aircraft in Color, “In 1911 Barber carried 151 passengers in his Valkyries without incident, and altogether flew more than 7000 miles during the year.”

“On 4 July 1911, Barber created a little piece of history by flying from Shoreham to Hove with the first item of freight ever sent by air: a carton of Osram electric light bulbs. He donated the £100 that he received to the Royal Aero Club….”

Barber Heritage. Despite these successes, by April 1912 Barber considered the syndicate a commercial failure and sold its assets to…

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Name Dropping

Name Dropping

When conducting historical research it's always a treat to uncover connections to famous people. Of course, one must tread with caution before stating absolutely that Horatio Barber had ties to inventor Thomas Alva Edison and the WWI Ace known as The Red Baron and the early 18th century pirate Stede Bonnet. In Airy Somethings, our … Continue reading Name Dropping

Straighten up and Fly Right

Straighten up and Fly Right

Horatio Barber enjoyed celebrity as an aviation pioneer in the early 1910s. He joined the ranks of other wealthy British flyers and he considered his work a “hobby”. He announced his retirement from aviation in 1912 explaining that it was too expensive to build a new plane every two to three months. In 1964, in … Continue reading Straighten up and Fly Right

Horatio Barber is back in Headline News!

Horatio Barber is back in Headline News!

Horatio Barber was an excellent self-promoter. Due to the nature of the man and the nature of his businesses, his name was often in the news. While he worked as a stockbroker in Canada, he submitted media releases and large, wordy advertisements to the newspapers around the world. Later, while involved in aviation in the … Continue reading Horatio Barber is back in Headline News!